Monthly Archives: September 2018

Build your Armor – Mind Body Spirit

Build your Armor – Mind Body Spirit
© Copyright Avi Nardia, Aleks Nardia, Chritopher Shabazz

 

Your armor will not defend you from the fear in your heart – Avi Nardia

 

“you’re only as old as your spine” Chinese proverb

 

Mens sana in corporesano

is a Latin phrase, usually translated as “a healthy mind in a healthy body”. The phrase is widely used in sporting and educational contexts to express the theory that physical exercise is an important or essential part of mental and psychological well-being.The phrase comes from Satire X of the Roman poet Juvenal

 

Mobility essential in Martial art

“We see in order to move; we move in order to see.”  ― William Gibson

“Nothing happens until something moves.” ― Albert Einstein

 

During one of my visits to Israel, I handed Mishel Horovitz  RIP ( the head Instructor for KAPAP at Palmach days and developer of the Stick fighting for KAPAP at the old days )  the KAPAP Krav Maga book written by me and published by Budo International Magazine, as well as a set of the KAPAP DVD published by Budo. As I was looking at some old pictures and manual books he had, I noticed one particular book called Practical Unarmed Combat – Moshe Feldenkrais 1942. This name took me back to my childhood memories and reminded me of one of the great pillars of Israeli Martial arts… a name you need to research. I remembered from my early age all the Judo and self defense books I used to read which were written by Moshe, as well as how he used to teach his fitness style at the time and how he became known for teaching the Israeli Prime Minister to stand on his head.

 

Moshe FeldenkraisThe only thing permanent about our behavior patterns is our belief that they are so.

 

Moshé Pinchas Feldenkrais was an Israeli engineer and physicist and the founder of the Feldenkrais Method,which claims to improve human functioning by increasing self-awareness through movement.

Feldenkrais’ theory is that “thought, feeling, perception and movement are closely interrelated and influence each other.” He was a scientist-clinician and among the greatest thinkers of the 20th Century on how to improve movement and function. He was far ahead of his time in understanding that the brain can change itself.

Throughout his life, he developed  a revolutionary method to improve skill and well-being, making the impossible possible.

 

Feldenkrais had a scientific mind that pushed  Japanese jujitsu which had exploded as an international phenomenon in the early 1900s. Feldenkrais learned jujitsu techniques for real life application in the street.  He published a book on Jujitsu that was based on what he had learned fighting and teaching others and was intended as a training tool for the Haganah, or Jewish defense forces. Much of his work was incorporated into the system that became known as KAPAP – Krav Maga today for sure. He was trained by the First Judo Black Belts and trained in the First Judo clubs in Paris, France

His ideas  and principles were based on “maximum efficiency with minimum effort” to everyone.

Throughout the years, I got involved with Brazilian Jiujutsu and started follow Ginastica Natural and Bio Ginastica by Prof. Orlando Cani, while I was student of Machado RCJ under Professor John Machado. This whole natural Body movement reminded me of my childhood and the days that I was teaching in Tel Aviv University. I was doing some warm up flows based on Bio Ginastica and another professor of the Feldenkrais method asked me if I teach Feldenkrais, which made me smile. No, I wasn’t teaching the Feldenkrais Method, but understanding body movement is common to all humans, isn’t it? When I visited India, I met a Yoga teacher that had done similar movements and when I went back to my BJJ class and asked Machado, he smiled and said yes, he knew the Yoga movements. During my most recent visit to Professor Machado’s school, I conducted a demo with a very talented student and martial art teacher, Ken Akiyama Sensei. His movement evolved into a new era and made me proud to see how his movement continues to develop and progress and how talented he is from the level I taught him and what he had made from that.

This helped me set a few principles on how we see movements  in KAPAP Krav Maga:

PRACTICAL – actually useful. Movement needs be helpful in everyday

life. From getting up in the Morning to fleeing from danger, our movements need to be based on need.

ADAPTABLE – Movement depends on context.  Based on specific and ever changing environments and situations and learning to adapt.

EFFICIENT –  efficiency and skillful performance while following the safety first safety last rule.

VITAL

The movements help keep us safe. They are useful in times of emergency.

INSTINCTUAL

Movement is instinctual, in contrast to Technique, which is not. Study  technique to turn instinct into ability.

COOPERATIVE

Study the Values and Morals and social skills lead to great friendship and community , work in a group to accomplish what no individual is capable of. Practice can be done alone or with group.

ENVIRONMENTAL practice both outdoors and indoors in order to maximize health benefits and increase well-being and connection with nature and healthy lifestyle.

EVOLUTIONARY   human  move has not changed. Our health is tied to moving as we, the human species, always has..

UNIVERSAL Movement is common to all human beings, regardless of origin, gender or age.

 

If you Practice Yoga once a week you will change your Mind

If you Practice Yoga twice a week you will change your Body

If you Practice Yoga every day you will change your Life

 

Any Yoga is Better than No Yoga

Yoga is a group of physicalmental, and spiritual practices or disciplines which originated in ancient India– Any Traditional  Martial Arts will teach the same — Yoga and art of Mobility is Part of Any Traditional Martial arts from Breathing – Sprit To Mind and Body .

We need more resolute, not excuse – Avi Nardia

 

Avi Nardia Academy – www.avinardia.com       www.avinardiablog.com

MILITARY GAMES – MIND GAMES AND HOW TO SURVIVE

MILITARY GAMES – MIND GAMES AND HOW TO SURVIVE
© Copyright Avi Nardia

SIMPLICITY  is the ultimate sophistication
-Leonardo da Vinci

 

No Groin no Krav Maga – No Brain No KAPAP

The brain is the strongest muscle in the body

Military Games – The goal is to hit you both emotionally and physically and to break your spirit and split you, individually or as a team – Your goal is to resist and keep ” one for all and all for one”and not allow your body, mind and spirit to be split and to remain and as group – “You can kill me but never defeat me”Motto of Mental training in Boot camp and Military games – Our Martial Art teaches team building and  FRIENDSHIP as well as skills; students understand that the instructors are there to make them strong, not make them fail, they are able to adapt their thinking. When given a task that seems impossible, the students learn that they must improvise to find a solution, and overcome all the barriers in order to complete their task.

Philosophy shared by  warriors. 

1.“The more you sweat in times of peace, the less you bleed in times of war”.

  1. A mindset of confidence.
  2. Set small goals throughout the day.
  3. You will always face a consequence for not hitting a goal.
  4. Train when you don’t feel like it.

 

Tips to build mental toughness, the body strength comes later:

  1. Focus on yourself first.

Self-awareness  build  “unbeatable mind.” It’s best to avoid making the same mistakes over and over

A journal – track your acheivements

  1. Figure out your purpose – Integrated training Martial arts sports, free diving and breathing training

 

The brain is the strongest muscle in the body – Train your mental endurance

Emergency Conditioning (EC): Make the Unknown Familiar

Using visualization techniques, practice what is known as emergency conditioning (EC). This means conditioning the mind in advance of emergencies, thus producing psychological strength in times of crisis. This is also referred to as “battle-proofing” or “battle inoculation” by military personnel

If the brain imagines something in deep and vivid detail, it will become part of a person’s “experience files.” This visualization exercise will actually fool the brain into believing that you have already experienced this event. This internal battle-proofing gives you an incredible advantage.

Create a Trigger– that makes you want to live, no matter what comes your way.

Situational Awareness

In military-speak, situational awareness is defined as the ability to identify, process, and comprehend the critical elements of information about what is happening to the team with regard to a mission

Situational Awareness Checklist

  • Try to guess what individuals around you are thinking or doing.
  • Look for odd behavior or things that seem out of place.
  • Determine where you’d go if you had to seek immediate cover from an explosion or gunshots.
  • Find the two closest exits.
  • Determine whether someone is following you or taking an unusual interest in you.

 

“The harder, the more miserable, and crazy it becomes, the stronger I get. No matter what happens, I’m getting stronger, not weaker.”

 

6  Mental Toughness Techniques for mental endurance                                                                                                                                                                          

Technique #1: 1. “Eat the Elephant”–Don’t Build Rome, Build One Single Home

One bite at a time. A solution in segmentation. Slowly divide the elephant into neatly digestible parts Application: Break down any daunting task into immediate, bite-sized objectives. Focus only on completing one at a time. Avoid considering the whole.

Technique #2: “Visualize Success”–Rehearse in Your Head

In a certain study, basketball players improved their free throw accuracy by 23% from just visualizing the free throws. Players who practiced actual free throws only improved by 24%. That’s a mere 1% difference.

Good visualizations have the following qualities:

  • Vivid and detailed.Engage all the senses. Imagine the particulars. Make it as real as possible.
  • Run the play-by-play over and over in your head. Make it automatic.
  • Positive Imagery.Do notenvision yourself failing. Instead, repeatedly envision yourself in a state of effortless success.
  • Imagine Consequences.If your fortitude wanes, imagine the consequences of failure. See the faces of your friends and family when they hear the news. Envision the pain of personal embarrassment.

 

Technique #3: “Emotional Control”–Witnessing Your Anxiety

In times of great stress, a rush of our body’s main stress hormones — adrenaline, cortisol, and norepinephrine — can give us a boost of energy and focus.

However, when these hormones stay elevated for long periods, we cannot switch to relaxation mode. We have trouble sleeping, motivation decreases and immune function takes a serious hit.

simple solution is something called the 4 by 4 for 4:

  1. Breathe in for 4 seconds
  2. Breathe out for 4 seconds
  3. Repeat for 4 minutes

 

Use simple breathing exercises to switch off your stress hormones and prep the body for relaxation.

Technique #4: “Nonreactivity”–Reframing the Moment

“Men are disturbed not by things, but the view they take of them.” — Epictetus

We can’t control what happens in our outside world, but we can control our interpretation of it.

Try to reframe any negative views into more positive ones. See “bad” events as a challenge for you to go out there and improve yourself.

 

Technique #5: “Small Victories”–Celebrate the Tiny Things

 

What should you do when nothing is going right and everything is going wrong?

Try to think smaller.

Small victories keep morale high. And high morale feeds forward into more high morale. It creates a virtuous circle of positivity for doing good work.

Technique #6: Find Your Tribe (and Necessity)Nobody Wins Alone

 

Humans don’t mind hardship, in fact they thrive on it; what they mind is not feeling necessary. Modern society has perfected the art of making people not feel necessary. It’s time for that to end.”

We humans are social creatures. And we crave meaning in a world that sometimes seems all too meaningless.

Find both — close friends and close principles — and you have a hotbed for mental resilience.

You’ve got the tools. All that’s left is to apply.

Mindset Training – Motivational Secrets

 

Mindset Training Plan in 3-D: Define It, Divide It, Do It Daily

 

Mindset Training requires thinking in three dimensions, and it’s not about creating a perfect plan, because there is no such thing. It’s about creating a plan to succeed no matter what obstacles you encounter:

 

 

Think Like an Elite Warrior

“Think like an Elite Warrior to Lead and Succeed.”

We are all leaders and followers – leading our family, our corporate tribe or ourselves. Whether we do it well is another issue. To think like an elite warrior means to train your body-mind to be able to excel in an environment that is volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous.

Master the  “VUCA” environments. VUCA is an acronym—first used in 1987—to describe or to reflect on the  volatility, uncertaintycomplexity and ambiguity of general conditions and situations. The deeper meaning of each element of VUCA serves to enhance the strategic significance of VUCA foresight and insight as well as the behaviour of groups and individuals in organizations.It discusses systemic failuresand behavioral failureswhich are characteristic of organizational failure.The business world is becoming a lot like the battlefield of the Spec Ops warrior. If the corporate and entrepreneurial leader can learn to find clarity amidst the uncertainty and take powerful action in spite of ambiguity, then they will lead and succeed at an elite level.

Remember and follow to start – the basic 6 at your First Boot Camp

  1. Positive self-talk.
  2. A “Why” or purpose.
  3. Focus on the immediate threat.
  4. Breathe.
  5. Visualize success.
  6. Quitting is not an option.

 

Dilemmas in the CQB / CQC  – “How Close is Too Close?”

Dilemmas in the CQB / CQC  – “How Close is Too Close?”
© Copyright Avi Nardia

 

 

Tueller Drill  –  OODA Loop and  Hick–Hyman law

 

The Japanese have a saying – Even Monkeys Fall from Trees!

サルも木きから落おちる (saru mo ki kara ochiru, rare) – even experts occasionally make mistakes.

From early slogan of Kapap – Noah’s Ark was built by amateurs, while The Titanic constructed by Experts. That is why it is ‘Better to be students of reality, rather than Masters of illusion.

Each day we study something new, we can judge videos of Bruce Lee today, but we need to remember the time it was made, it was the best new knowledge at the time.

Over time things evolve and progress, we can’t look with today’s knowledge into the old, we need to look as studies progress and always remember than even monkeys fall from trees.

 

Tueller Drill is a self-defense training exercise to prepare against a short-range knife attack when armed only with a holstered handgun.

Sergeant Dennis Tueller, of the Salt Lake City, Utah Police Department experimented on how quickly an attacker with a knife could cover 21 feet (6.4 m), so he timed volunteers as they raced to stab the target. He determined that it could be done in 1.5 seconds. These results were first published as an article in SWAT magazine in 1983 and in a police training video by the same title, “How Close is Too Close?”

A defender with a gun has a dilemma. If he shoots too early, he risks being accused of murder. If he waits until the attacker is definitely within striking range so there is no question about motives, he risks injury and even death. The Tueller experiments quantified a “danger zone” where an attacker presented a clear threat.

 

  • An armed (edged or blunt weapon) suspect can cross 21 feet in about 1.5 seconds
  • An officer may draw from the holster and fire 2 rounds in 1 – 1.5 seconds
  • Those first rounds may not stop the threat

 

Teller’s drill is the foundation for some of today’s action/reaction time research, which should be correctly applied to train officers to increase distance (when possible) in myriad situations. The distance increase is likely beyond what officers may have originally felt was sufficient.

Submitted as evidence are the following suspect-movement time studies:

  • Study illustrates that seated suspects can cross five feet at an average of 1.3 seconds
  • Study shows standing suspects can cross six feet at an average of 1.1 seconds
  • Study shows standing suspects can cross 25 feet at an average of 1.6 seconds

 

The Tueller Rule as deadly 21 feet Zone giving martial artists a tricky problem dealing with the short distance – we all know the best defense is run a way, but what if you can’t run away, your locked into a situation and can’t escape.

I want KAPAP Krav Maga to lead the way in dealing with the issue of close distance, and create the best concepts in close quarter conflict. Krav means close quarter in Hebrew and Maga means – touch as combat touch.

Working with the Grom shooting team and Master Željko Vujčić, we have made a new DVD for Budo Magazine, ‘Self Defense with Guns’. The DVD is purely about guns, it covers empty hand working with NO time for reaction.

To make sure we all understand the problem and find better solutions (as the market is loaded with instructors selling fear, picking fault and not offering solutions – we have all been aware of the problems for many years, but can’t guarantee the best solutions as they are complex problems. We can buy many things but not time).

The 21 feet measurement is a deadly zone, even if we double the distance and make it 42 feet (12.8 metres). Most people think that doubling the distance means doubling the time.

BUT, it’s not as straight forward as it seems. In the first 21 feet, the attacker goes from zero to maximum speed. The next 21 feet the attacker has accelerated their speed and reaching that distance only takes 2 seconds. This shows us how the problem of short distance can be, and how we lose time for good reaction.

Let us add into it – Exsanguination this is the loss of blood to a degree sufficient to cause death.  It is most commonly known as “bleeding to death.” These words ‘bleed to death’ create more issues.

It can take between 6-14 seconds to bleed out depending on the injuries sustained. This means even if you shoot someone they can still run long enough to reach and stab you.

The Tuller drill can be applied to knife fighting too. Over the years I have watch Kali and Hubud drills, when I watch this reminds me that these are just DRILLS. They are too choreographed to work in real life.

Why? Because you don’t want to be working the same distance as your attacker. If you can cut them, they can cut you. One of my first KAPAP slogans used was: “Even a dead man can kill you”.

Based on this concept we take the risk away first, by attacking the hand of the assailant nullifying the threat. I have watched too many instructors filled with ego, teaching students to cut to the neck, rather than the hand.

This brings us back into shooting different ideas with the Mozambique Drill also known as the Failure Drill or Failure to Stop Drill, or informally, “two to the body, one to the head. We recommend using the death triangle, aiming between the eyes and mouth. But continue shooting until the threat has been neutralized. We talk on Stop Power and what’s called “Pocket shooting ” example as break hip be stop power , Ammo and velocity gun caliber all play in stop power as so drugs and others factors on object.

It’s important to note when hand to hand training, remember that just because you’re not bleeding on the outside doesn’t mean you’re not bleeding. Internal bleeding can be tricky, hard to detect and may show up only as bruising or swelling, if it shows up at all. However, internal bleeding can be extremely serious, especially bleeding from major arteries. You can bleed into your chest or abdominal cavity and die without ever showing a single drop of blood on the outside.

The next idea is – Hick’s law, or the Hick–Hyman law, named after British and American psychologists William Edmund Hick and Ray Hyman.

This method describes the time it takes for a person to decide as a result of the possible choices they have: increasing the number of choices will increase the decision time logarithmically.

Hick’s Law is a simple idea that says that the more choices you present your users with, the longer it will take them to reach a decision.

 

You can find applications of Hick’s Law everywhere, not just in web and app design. Hick’s Law determined the number of controls on your microwave or your washing machine. A design principle known as “K.I.S.S.” (“Keep It Short and Simple”) became recognized in the 1960s for its effectiveness in this regard. Echoing Hick’s Law, K.I.S.S. states that simplicity is the key for a system to work in the best way.

But remember – Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication. Leonardo da Vinci

 

Finally, the last idea: The OODA loop. This is the decision cycle of observe, orient, decide, and act, developed by military strategist and United States Air Force Colonel John Boyd. Boyd applied the concept to the combat operations process, often at the operational level during military campaigns. It is now also often applied to understand commercial operations and learning processes. The approach favors agility over raw power in dealing with human opponents in any endeavor.

The one thing that is really good and effective in self-defense training, close combat training, Police training and military training is this. Experience teaches the student to fly through the OODA loop while keeping the enemy in the OODA loop.

OODA stands for Observe, Orient, Decide and Act. This process is what our brain must go through during any given task. We observe that something is happening, orient towards it (figure out what it is), decide as to what we need to do and then act.

 

The “OODA Loop” principle was developed by Lt. Col. John Boyd for aerial combat in the Korean and Vietnam war era. John R Boyd figured this science out as a young U.S. Air Force fighter pilot. John was cocky even by fighter-pilot standards… he issued a standing challenge to anyone who dared to try to defeat him in mock aerial combat. To make it even more of a challenge for him once in the air he would start from a position of disadvantage. He bet that he’d have his jet on the challenger’s tail within 40 seconds, or he’d pay them $40. Legend has it that he never lost. His amazing ability to win any dogfight in 40 seconds or less earned him his nickname “40 Second” Boyd.

 

What Lt. Col. Boyd discovered was that if he could keep the opponent in the loop, and he got through OODA, he had gained a great advantage. For example, if the enemy was observing Boyd doing a roll right, by the time they had orientated to this move and could decide or act, Boyd would roll left forcing the enemy back in the OODA loop all over again.

 

As Boyd taught the principal to airmen to use the loop (and keep others in it) he discovered that after five rounds of actual air combat that pilot became virtually unbeatable. After five attempts they would not get caught in the loop anymore and act first and keep the initiative. He put science behind successful pilots who fought in WWI and WWII, pilots who shot down enemy aircraft were called ‘Ace’s’.

 

Control the loop and keep the attacker in the loop.

 

The OODA Loop works on us as well as the enemy. That’s why we want to trap them, by constant observation. Experience has taught us to stay orientated and block their ability to make decisions fast enough. This can be done in two ways, by verbal domination and changing channels, and having a better relative position.

By keeping a constant step ahead of the opponent, using action / reaction, by studying, analyzing, training and learning to recover from the worst situation.

Then we can still win the fight.

 

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Introduction to Close Quarters Battle (CQB)

Introduction to Close Quarters Battle (CQB)
© Copyright Avi Nardia

 

 

CQB can be described as combat taking place within buildings, cars, hallways, stairwells, rooms, enclosures, and other constricted spaces. Although CQB training first started with military and law enforcement personnel, it is now being taught to security unit personnel and civilians. CQB is important to security forces because the techniques associated with CQB serve as the foundation for recapture tactics. As a result, security units and their personnel must have the ability to respond to a “worst case scenario” by recapturing the asset that it is protecting.

CQB can involve – individually or collectively, hand-to-hand combat, weapons, and more. As a result, we need to be proficient with every move. For instance, with hand-to-hand combat we cannot assume that the enemy will freeze up when we engage him. We need to think that he will counter our moves so we need to consider this and be ready for it in the fight – whether it is with a firearm or with a knife. That is why in Kapap we include these elements as a part of the hand-to-hand combat program.

 

Violent Confrontation

This term is used to describe a meeting of two or more combatants (even if one or more is passive) where there is the potential for or actual use of extreme destructive force. This type of confrontation usually occurs at close range in a short amount of time.

 

The SOP 9 Study

This study was conducted in New York and examined every shot fired in the line of duty by law enforcement officials during the course of one year. Out of a total of 2,047 shots fired that year only 217 actually hit their intended targets and only 10 percent of these shots hit vital organs. During interviews with the officers involved in these shootings the majority of them commented that they never even acquired their front sights when they engaged their target. Additionally, these officers also experienced some or all of the following:The confrontations took place at the range of ten feet or less with duration of less than four seconds. During this time, fewer than five rounds were fired.

* The typical response was from the holster.

* A sudden feeling of shock and surprise overwhelmed the officers.

The end result of this study showed that the police officers were NOT trained properly enough to handle these of life and death situations. Now, can you imagine what it would be like for a civilian who has even less training than these officers? That is why, for civilians, realistic training is needed and should be conducted by experienced firearms instructors.

 

THINGS TO CONSIDER:

Psychological Aspects : Under severe stress, the normal mental processes become extremely difficult and the mind resorts to its most basic processes.

The following are examples of psychological effects you may experience during a combat situation or any other high stress situation:

1. Tunnel vision: Under extreme stress your attention will primarily be focused on the greatest threat and, as a result, you will have a temporary loss of peripheral vision.

2. Auditory Exclusion: As with tunnel vision, you will focus on the greatest threat and will have the inability to hear for a period of time. For instance, you will probably not hear anyone shouting at you.

3. Electro Dermal Stimulation: A reaction of the skin that makes the hair stand up on the arms and the back of neck.

4. Time/Space Compression: There will be a slow down in the perceived passage of time and a shift in perceived spatial relationship in times of high stress. This is caused by the inability to judge speed and distance and accurately balance the two. Also, you may experience a slowing down of time. In other words, everybody will seem to move in slow motion.

5. Mental Track: In most high stress situations, to include life and death situations, a person’s ability to keep track of the details of the situation taking place around him becomes nearly impossible. In most police shootings, a police officer being debriefed after an engagement does not usually remember how many rounds that he fired. This can happen even in training. Therefore, as a shooter, you must learn to beware of the number of rounds you fired so the weapon does not run completely dry in the middle of a firefight. This concept of awareness not only applies to a shooting situation, but also applies to hand-to-hand combat and edged weapons.

 

Physiological Aspects: Regardless of how much training an individual has certain studies, along with the SOP 9 study; show that during a combat situation, one or more physical changes take place in an individual’s body. That is why proper training is necessary to help minimize certain aspects.

The following are examples of physiological effects you may experience during a combat situation or any other high stress situation:

1. Pulse and Breathing: In any excitable situation, pulse and breathing will always be affected. Your heart rate increases and your breathing becomes rapid and shallow.

2. Adrenaline: This is nothing more than a hormone that stimulates involuntary nerve action. The amount of stress you are placed under will depend on the amount of adrenaline released into the system. When adrenaline is released into the body, it stimulates the muscles. This causes them to tighten. Depending on the individual and the situation, this is more than adequate to affect an individual’s shooting position or fighting position.

3. Coordination and Reflexes: Under any type of stress hand and eye coordination degrade severely, especially the coordination of the hand and fingers.

 

The Chemical Cocktail

The reactions just discussed are the result of the body’s survival response to a potentially lethal situation. When suddenly placed in a life-threatening situation, the body will dump the below listed chemicals into the bloodstream and mix with sodium. This “chemical cocktail” creates an imbalance characterized by general muscle tightening and loss of fine motor skills. This chemical cocktail includes:

1. Epinephrine: An adrenal hormone that stimulates automatic nerve action (fight).

2. Nor – Epinephrine: A hormone that is formed naturally in the body’s nerve endings during times of fear (flight).

3. Cortazol: A crystalline hormone released to the body’s nerve endings during times of fear (fight).

The body’s reaction : The body’s response to this imbalance by releasing potassium to counteract the effects of the sodium. However, this process takes time and slows our ability to react. As a result, we must always seek to minimize the impact that this chemical cocktail has on us in order to improve our reaction times. We can do this by training to maintain the proper “mindset”.

Mindset is a term used to describe an individual’s state of mental readiness to act or react to a stimulus in our environment that ensures survival. This proper combat mindset is neither learned nor can it be taught, it must be developed from within. The tools you need for proper combat mindset can only be exposed in a schoolhouse environment to help you to develop yourself.

 

The Breakdown of the Mind:

Conscious Mind: The conscious mind is the thinking part of the mind. It takes seconds to make decisions when using this part of the brain. In any type of combat situation the conscious mind’s decision making process is too slow to keep you alive. The conscious mind is a hindrance causing you to have to react to every situation instead of acting.

Sub-Conscious Mind: Reacts to situations. This part of the mind works in quarter seconds, which is much faster than the conscious mind. It has to be trained in order for it to work properly.

When training, the skills being learned need not only to be simple, but sound and effective. The sub-conscious mind is only developed through proper repetition (muscle memory) in training.

You must strive for perfection each and every repetition.

If you train poorly, or if the training is too complicated or too detailed, when the sub-conscious mind takes over it will not be able to respond properly to the situation. What occurs is the conscious mind identifies the situation, realizes it cannot handle it, and then turns it over to the sub-conscious mind to react. That is why we say that in any type of combat situation a person must rely on his training in order to survive.

 

The Optimum Combat Mindset:

Optimum combat mindset is the state of mind where you have prepared yourself mentally (both consciously and sub consciously), physically, emotionally, tactically, and technically to endure the rigors of combat for prolonged periods of time and under extremely adverse conditions, and still remain effective.

 

Developing a Combat Mindset:

Like the body the mind needs to be conditioned to respond or function properly in combat. When faced with a combat situation you want your mind to be free of distractions so that all of your focus is on the mission at hand – such as getting out of a situation and if it’s at the killing zone, killing the enemy and surviving the encounter). You need to be mentally prepared for death and injury and you need to go into the fight prepared for the worst. For instance, if you find yourself in a knife fight you should expect to get cut or if you go into a shooting you should expect to get shot.

Remember, response time is a critical factor in surviving a violent confrontation in a CQB environment. Do not waste time analyzing and second-guessing in an attempt to make the best possible decision. The time that is saved in the thought process will in turn save your life as you fight to end the fight.

One of the most Important things to remember is do not forget the One plus rule – if you get into a fight hand to hand think he could have a knife ,if he has a knife he could have another one or a gun All the time keep alert and one step ahead!

Gross motor skills Fine Motor Skills and complex motor skills are part of the combat and the stress effect it in different ways we need to ready as set training to face reality and stress effecting 

Make KAPAP Combatives rules and “S-words of Wisdom” as a way of life

The first rule is that there are no rules….

 

KAPAP Combatives “S-words Of Wisdom”

Kapap – Martial arts that teach Traditional – Cultural – Contemporary Research and Explore study Personal – teaching evaluation of techniques with no conflicts

Most People like talk, we like to do!

Fearlessness and Determination are the key to the fighting Spirit, the key to winnning the fight!

“Israeli martial arts and CQB, a concept before it was a martial art”

“Always a student, sometimes a teacher”

“Better a student of reality than a master of illusion”

“Any weapon – one mind“

” be the weapon ” your self make yourself the  first weapon- than any weapon you carry be more effective – do not depend on weapon only 

“Edged weapons do not run out of ammunition and they not jam much as can also changing angels of attack ” thats what make them more risk to disarm than gun 

“If you fight an edged weapon assume that you may get cut if you fight a gun assume you get shoot – now see all from damage control concept and assume that make sure its not vital areas as set them on priority  in your defense 

“There are two kinds of fights: for your ego or for your life. Kapap is for the fight for your life”

KAPAP agenda – we look for quality not quantity!YOU buy your certificate with hard of and write it with special ink made from blood tears and sweat 

Because of the experience – no one can fight with experience. Find a good teacher!

Kapap-Krav Panim El Panim – The next step in Israeli martial arts – all you need is INTEGRITY – We get you the skills and knowledge need – ANA Moto (Avi Nardia Academy)